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Navy 2018 Calendar

$15.95
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The Navy 2018 wall calendar is a tribute to the men and women who have fought to protect our nation, to deter aggression, and to maintain freedom of the seas. Navy and Marine Corps action during the past 240 years is represented here in full-color paintings. Significant events in naval history are listed in every month. Sales of the calendar benefit the Naval Historical Foundation. Anchors aweigh!

Published by Tide-mark, The Navy 2018 wall calendar opens to 13.75 x 20.5 inches.

Ships and events featured in the 2018 Navy wall calendar include:

American Pastime, Baseball

Painting by Walter W. Bollendonk

Collection of the United States Navy

Chief Yeoman Richard W. Caron unwinds to deliver the first pitch of an historic North Pole ball game held on August 25, 1960. In the distance the sail of the USS Seadragon (SSN 584) can be seen broaching the polar ice. The nuclear submarine briefly surfaced during a voyage under the Arctic ice cap from Portsmouth, New Hampshire to Honolulu, Hawaii.

Search and Rescue Operation, Red Sea; USS Lloyd Thomas

Painting by Gene Klebe

Collection of the United States Navy

 

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The Lloyd Thomas (DD 764) was commissioned after the conclusion of World War II and fought during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Turned over to Taiwan in 1972, the destroyer continued to operate for more than another quarter century. On one of her many overseas deployments, during the summer of 1964 the destroyer cruised around the Red Sea and Persian Gulf to promoting good relations and to conduct exercises in harsh environs.

Follow the Boys in Blue for Home and Country

Painting by George Hand Wright

Collection of the United States Navy

Though the United States remained neutral at the outbreak of World War I, this 1914 recruitment poster evoked vigilance as a theme. Of note when the United States did enter the war three years later, the Navy would also actively recruit women into its ranks for the first time.  

USF Chesapeake

Painting by Frank Muller

Collection of the United States Navy

As one of the first six frigates constructed specifically for the United States Navy, the ship was launched in 1799 from the Gosport Yard in Portsmouth, Virginia, and served during the Quasi-War with France and the first Barbary War. She was forced to strike her colors on June 22, 1807 when fired on by HMS Leopard. The “Chesapeake-Leopard” incident provoked the War of 1812. In a ship-to-ship engagement off Boston on June 1, 1813, Chesapeake was captured by HMS Shannon, but not before a dying Captain James Lawrence uttered the immortal words: “Don’t Give Up the Ship.” 

Dawn

Painting by Robert Adam Malin

Collection of the United States Navy

This image depicts a plane crew on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) readying an F/A-18 Hornet for flight operations. This contemporary scene is repeated daily throughout the world on the decks of the U.S. Navy’s Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. 

The Battle of Belleau Woods – Advancing Germans Halted by 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, June 3, 1918

Painting by Harvey Dunn

Collection of the United States Navy

A century ago, using divisions transferred from Russia, the Germans launched a massive late-Spring offensive in France aimed at ending the war before American forces arrived in overwhelming numbers. As part of this drive, on June 4, 1918, the Germans made a determined assault against the recently arrived 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines at Belleau Wood. With bayonets fixed, these Germans were felled by accurate Marine rifle fire.

Helicopter

Painting by Phillip Jenkins

Collection of the United States Navy

During the Vietnam War, the U.S. Navy engaged in brown-water operations in the Mekong Delta and in other coastal waters using Swift boats and other riverine craft. To provide overhead support, the Navy created a light-attack helicopter squadron, [HA(L)-3], known as the Seawolves, that flew UH-1B Huey helicopters acquired by the Army

USS Indiana and USS Brooklyn at New York City After Victory at Santiago

Painting by Leslie Arthur Wilcox

Collection of the United States Navy

As part of the naval review in honor of Admiral George Dewey in New York City celebrating the end of the Spanish American War, the battleship USS Indiana and the cruiser USS Brooklyn pass by the Statue of Liberty.

D-Minus One Bombardment

Painting by William F. Draper

Collection of the United States Navy

Historian James D. Hornfischer writing in The Fleet at Flood Tide (2016) discusses the battle for Saipan as a pivotal point in the struggle against the Japanese empire in the Pacific. The mid-June 1944 assault on the island with a large Japanese civilian population would take a heavy toll on the American invading forces. Once captured, Saipan would serve as a base for B-29 bombing raids against the Japanese home islands.

USS Hue City “Hold Fast” CG-66, Fourth of July 2012, Cannes, France

Painting by Monica Allen Perin

Collection of the United States Navy

During a port call at Cannes, France, the guided missile cruiser displays its colorful signal flags in honor of the United States Independence Day

Surrender of the German High Seas Fleet, 1918

Painting by Bernard F. Gribble

Collection of the United States Navy

Ten days after the signing of the armistice on November 11, 1918, the German High Seas Fleet steamed into the North Sea to place their ships under British internment until their fate would be determined. In June of the following year, rather than allowing the British to seize his ships anchored at Scapa Flow, the German commander ordered the skeleton crews to scuttle their ships. 52 of 74 interned vessels sank beneath the waves.  

A Fine Evening on the USS Mustin

Painting by Morgan Ian Wilbur

Collection of the United States Navy

Named to honor three generations of Mustins who served in the U.S. Navy through most of the 20th century, the guided missile destroyer Mustin continues to serve with the Pacific fleet. From the port bridge wing of Mustin, a lookout watches a rain squall and the sunset over the Pacific Ocean.

 

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