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Navy 2021 Wall Calendar

$15.95
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UPC:
9781631143410
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Expected publication date is August 2020

The Navy calendar is a tribute to the men and women who have fought to protect our nation, to deter aggression, and to maintain freedom of the seas. Navy and Marine Corps action over the past 246 years is represented here in full-color paintings. Significant events in naval history are listed in every month. Sales of the calendar benefit the Naval Historical Foundation. Anchors aweigh!

Navy 2021 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Beautiful reproduction | Quality heavy-weight paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Navy vessels and events pictured in this edition include:

USS Nautilus (SSN 571)

On January 17, 1955, USS Nautilus sent her historic signal “underway on nuclear power,” beginning the age of nuclear propulsion. The submarine then began a legacy of breaking endurance records and achieving “firsts.” During her shakedown cruise she set records for the longest submerged cruise and for the highest underwater sustained speed. Later, Nautilus would traverse under the North Pole – another first! Decommissioned, Nautilus remains available for touring along with the Naval Submarine Museum at Groton, CT. 

Kamikaze USS Hornet

A Kamikaze goes down in flames missing the carrier Hornet (CV 12). Poetically named “divine wind” in honor of a typhoon that had saved Japan from a Mongol invasion, suicide attacks tested American resolve and anti-aircraft defenses. Hornet would later recover Apollo 11 following a successful Lunar mission. The ship serves as a museum today at Alameda, California.

The Ironclads

In March 1862, the war at sea was forever changed when the USS Monitor fought the CSS Virginia to a draw in the Battle of Hampton Roads. Sunk later in the war off Cape Hatteras, portions of Monitor have been recovered and are undergoing preservation at the Mariners Museum in Newport News, VA.

Berthing the Newly-Arrived Submarine

Clamagore (SS 343) arrives at the U.S. Navy Submarine Base at New London, CT. in the 1960s. Modernized after World War II, the now-decommissioned submarine is open for tours at Patriots Point, South Carolina.

USS Arizona, Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941

Commissioned in 1916, Arizona (BB 39) was modernized in 1929 to the configuration seen in this depiction. Moored with other battleships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the battleship was truck by eight Japanese bombs, one striking the forward powder magazine that proved to be fatal. Sunk in place with 1,103 of her crew, her hull remains in place at Pearl Harbor berthed ahead of the USS Missouri (BB 63) as a national memorial, honoring her Sailors and all others who died at sea during World War II.

Low Level Mission

The A-4 Skyhawk jet saw operational service with the Navy and Marine Corps from 1956 to the late 1990s. Skyhawks can be seen on display on museum ship aircraft carriers such as Intrepid in New York, NY; Yorktown near Charleston, SC; Lexington at Corpus Christi, TX; Midway, at San Diego, CA; and Hornet, at Alameda, CA, as well as the National Museum of Naval Aviation at Pensacola FL and the National Museum of the Marine Corps at Quantico, VA. 

Hominy Station, Firefight and Ambush—Swift Boat in Rung Sat

Explosions, flares, and tracers light up the night in the crisscrossing channels of the Rung Sat swamp, the strategic area in South Vietnam located between Saigon and the South China Sea. An inshore patrol craft (PCF) commonly called a “Swift Boat” engages Viet Cong ambushers. A remaining Swift Boat is on display along the Anacostia River at the Washington Navy Yard outside of the Navy Museum.

Ghost Ship

Battleships, cruisers and destroyers lent powerful support to U.N. troops fighting ashore throughout the Korean War. In this image, atmospheric conditions at dusk add an air of mystery to the battleship New Jersey. The World War II vintage warship would serve again in Vietnam and the 1980s and is currently a museum ship at Camden, N.J.

Low Level Mission

The A-4 Skyhawk jet saw operational service with the Navy and Marine Corps from 1956 to the late 1990s. Skyhawks can be seen on display on museum ship aircraft carriers such as Intrepid in New York, NY; Yorktown near Charleston, SC; Lexington at Corpus Christi, TX; Midway, at San Diego, CA; and Hornet, at Alameda, CA, as well as the National Museum of Naval Aviation at Pensacola FL and the National Museum of the Marine Corps at Quantico, VA. 

USS Olympia

This month marks the 100th anniversary of the arrival on Olympia of the Unknown soldier killed in World War I from France. The image depicted above represents the ship a quarter century earlier when she served as the flagship of the Asiatic Fleet. In 1898 she flew the flag of Commodore George Dewey during the battle of Manila Bay. Built as a cruiser at Union Ironworks in San Francisco, Olympia remains on display at Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia.

Arrival of the American Fleet at Scapa Flow

During World War I, Rear Adm. Hugh Rodman took Battleship Division Nine to England to strengthen the British Grand Fleet. On December 7, 1919, Rodman’s flagship New York (BB 34) led his division into Scapa Flow. Rodman would later request that New York’s sister ship, Texas (BB 35) steam across the Atlantic to join the squadron. Texas remains on display at San Jacinto, Texas as the last battleship in the world remaining on display that served in this conflict.

 About the Naval Historical Foundation

 Ninety years ago, Commodore Dudley Knox wrote an article
titled “Our Vanishing History and Traditions.” His criticism
of “glaring deficiencies” in collecting and preserving the
Navy’s records caused a stir, and in 1926, resulted in creation
of the Naval Historical Foundation under the sponsorship of the Secretary
of the Navy. From its initial focus on safeguarding the material culture of
the Navy, the foundation has developed into an educational non-profit
organization that preserves and promotes the full range of naval history.
• Today, besides supporting the Navy’s historical programs
(particularly, the Navy Museum and the Navy Art Collection,
which are components of the Naval History and Heritage
Command), the foundation collects the oral histories and
memoirs of veterans from World War II to the Cold War, publishes
monographs, and sponsors conferences on naval history topics.
• The foundation also operates the Navy Museum Store, offering a
variety of nautical-related clothing, memorabilia, publications, and
other unique items. (www.museumstore.navyhistory.org)
The Naval Historical Foundation has had a long relationship with the Navy
Art Collection. The foundation has facilitated the donation or purchase
of works of art for a collection that has grown to more than 20,000
pieces, offering a special visual record of America’s maritime history.
The collection includes rare eyewitness portrayals of the Navy’s service
from the Revolutionary War to the present. Artists often provided the only
accurate representations of naval actions, and their works bear witness
to the valor and spirit of sacrifice of those who have served. While the
collection depicts the Navy’s service on our own lakes and rivers from
the Revolution to the Civil War, it also brings to life the work of our naval
forces in waters around the world. For more than two centuries, the U.S.
Navy has been a forward deployed force, representing American interests
on the “Seven Seas” with honor, courage, and commitment.
Maritime art enthusiasts can view a portion of the collection at the Naval
History and Heritage Command’s Web site, www.history.navy.mil. That
Web site also provides information on a traveling exhibit program that
permits museums and similar institutions to mount art shows in their
public spaces.
Besides acquiring new works for the collection and helping to conserve
older works, the Naval Historical Foundation strongly supports projects
to preserve presently held works and make them accessible by digitizing
the art and putting the images online. We appreciate your purchase of this
calendar, as royalties from its sale will assist that ongoing effort.
Of course, bequests and donations to support U.S. Navy art are always
welcome! Please contact us to find out how you can help the Navy Art
Collection or become a member of the foundation.

 

 

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