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Calendars

Sailing to the Mark 2025 Wall Calendar

$17.95

How to sail faster than your competitors? How to round the mark first and find a breeze to keep you ahead? On salt water and fresh all around America, sailors are planning strategies to overcome the limits of their waterlines and finesse the right of way to tack ahead of the competition. Andrew Sims and JH Peterson capture the excitement of competitive sailing around the world and bring great races together in Sailing to the Mark 2025 calendar.

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Races and locations featured in this edition include:
≈ Going for the mark, a collection of E Scows competes in Sarasota, FL during 2023 races marking the 100th anniversary of the one-design sailing dingy. A meeting of the Inland Lake Yachting Association in 1923 led to creation of the class. The original was designed by Arnold Meyer Sr.

≈ Tell the crew of a 49er sailing dingy to take a hike, and they will happily agree. The 4.99 meter (16 feet four inch) high performance skiff is managed by a crew of two, each attached to a trapeze that encourages hanging out on the wings. Teams from around the world race here on Florida’s Biscayne Bay, competing to earn points toward possible Olympic selection.

≈ Sailing for Olympic points in Miami, Fl, Nacra 17 catamarans offer wet and wild sailing competition. The boats use curved dagger boards that create vertical lift and, as the International Sailing Federation committee evaluating the design noted, present an “exciting challenge.”

Sunfish are so pervasive that we might be forgiven for believing the design had sprung fullblown from the head of Poseidon. In fact, Al Bryan and Cort Heyniger crafted the original plywood version in 1951 by adding a “cockpit” to their successful Sailfish design. The 1959 transformation into fiberglass made the Sunfish so appealing to a vast audience of sailors that North American Championship racing began in 1963.

≈ Sailing in the classic division of the International 12-Metre World Association races in 2021 are four American boats. Built in 1958, Columbia, US 16, successfully defended the America’s Cup in a 4-0 win over Sceptre. Built in 1964, American Eagle, US 21, was outpaced in Cup trials by Constellation. Launched in 1928 Onowa, US 6, saw only a lackluster racing career. Also built in 1958, Weatherly, US 17, lost in the trials, was rebuilt, and defended the Cup successfully in 1962 against Gretel, four races to one.

≈ The New York Yacht Club hosts America’s most venerable regatta, first run on the Hudson River in 1845. As the outline of the Verrazano Bridge on the horizon suggests, today’s racers now hoist their sails off Newport, RI. The June regatta offers three days of racing for One-design, ORC and PHRF classes, as well as for classic yachts and multihulls. These ORC boats are sailing the West Passage of Narragansett Bay.

≈ Modern versus traditional, Kodiak and Marilee compete here for the Shipyard Cup in Boothbay, ME. Built Down Under to a design by Reichel/Pugh in California, 66-foot Kodiak (sailing as Blue Yankee) won first overall in the 2002 racing division of the Newport-Bermuda Race. NYYC 13, Marilee is one of only four Nathaniel Herreshoff NY40, One-designs still sailing. Launched in 1926, Marilee demonstrated her notable pedigree winning the cup in 2021.

≈ Directing traffic? No time! This is Thursday night racing at the Wayazata Yacht Club on Lake Minnetonka, MN. The WYC manages one of the largest sailboat racing programs in America. On a Thursday evening as many as 130 keel boats like these J22s may be racing on the lake. Through the course of a year, the WYC hosts some 65 events.

≈ Blasting along in choppy water off San Francisco, CA, these J/105s are running with spinnakers flying. Designed for speed and stability, J/105s sail in 15-to 20-knot winds without reefing. Popular across the country, there are 15 American fleets sailing some 650 copies of the J/105.

≈ The Laser may be a one-design dingy, but it is important to know that there are three Laser flavors. Sail size ILCA 7 is standard or Olympic, ILCA 6 is radial, and ILCA 4 is 4.7 meters. No matter your flavor, sailing a Laser is clearly an athletic event as those who have extended their torsos over the rail can confirm after even one tack here on Florida’s Sarasota Bay.

≈ These big Pac 52 boats are sailing in Rolex competition on San Francisco Bay. The 52 was established as a new class to compete in racing on the west coast and in the biennial Transpac Race between Los Angeles, CA and Honolulu, HI. The traditional approach to protecting sails from mold and sun damage was to soak canvas in tree bark tannins that dyed them red. Today’s high-tech solution is to use black carbon fiber.

≈ Heading for the first mark, these DN iceboats are sailing on Lake Christina, MN. Measuring 12 feet long and weighing only 120 pounds, no hull-speed limitations apply. The average DN equipped with an aluminum mast can sail three times the speed of the wind, while a boat equipped with a carbon fiber mast could sail four times the wind speed.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

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San Francisco Cable Cars 2025 Calendar

$17.95

San Francisco is a city of hills. Horses powered the first public transportation to traverse them, but the demands were brutal. In 1869 Andrew Hallidie devised a system of steam powered cables to move the first cable cars. Horses were saved and San Francisco became a city of the future. The San Francisco  Cable Car 2025 calendar pictures the system in operation between the 1940s and the 1960s. Wait for the bell!
• Large blocks for notes
• Superbly printed throughout
• Reproduced on quality 100-pound paper
• Deluxe 11 by 14-inch size

Locomotives and trains featured include:

√ Cable Car 516, a Powell and Hyde Streets car, is on the Hyde Street Turntable on September 22, 1959.

√ Cable Car 523 is at Washington and Steiner Streets on August 25, 1958.

√ Cable Car 60, a Van Ness, California and Market Street car, is at California and Market Streets on August 23, 1962.

√ Cable Car 501, a Powell and Mason Street car, is at Bay and Taylor Streets on April 26, 1968.

√ Cable Car 523 is a Hyde and Jackson Street car turning a corner from Jackson onto Hyde Street on May 15, 1954.

√ Cable Car 57, a Van Ness, California and Market Street car is backing into a car barn off Jackson Street in July 1959.

√ Cable Car 522, a Washington and Jackson Street car has only a few passengers running on Steiner Street on May 25, 1956.

√ Cable Car 2 is at the Pacific Union Club in August 1949. What a collection of period automobiles!

√ Cable Car 61 is a Van Ness Avenue and Market Street car, seen in May 1954.

√ Cable Car 4 is on a steep incline on California Street near Hyde Street in October 1956.

√ Cable Car 14 is a Presidio Avenue and Market Streets car photographed on November 5, 1941.

√ Two cable cars: on the left is Car 30, a California and Market Street car, and on the right is Van Ness and Market Street Car 38. They are on California at Stockton Street in October 1956. The red Plymouth station wagon looks brand new.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

Available In 6/17/2024 11:21 AM

Santa Fe Railway 2025 Calendar

$17.95

Chartered just before the Civil War, during the next three decades the tracks of the Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe reached from Chicago to Los Angeles. Santa Fe Railway trains provided the country’s most appealing passenger service and for shippers, the most innovative intermodal freight service in America. The Santa Fe Railway 2025 calendar features classic steam and diesel locomotives working on the ATSF.

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Locomotives and trains featured in this edition include:
≈ Santa Fe 38C (two F-7A’s and three F-7B’s) lead Train #2, the eastbound San Francisco Chief into Chillicothe, IL in January 1970.

≈ Santa Fe 81, an E-8m, is on a southbound Chief connection train, making a station stop at Pueblo, CO, in February 1966. 81 was rebuilt from an early E Unit in 1953, and for several years was in longhaul passenger train service, such as the Super Chief and others. As seen here, running as Train #201, It mostly completed its career on the 183-mile-long Chief Connection from Denver to La Junta, Colorado. It was retired in 1970.

≈ In what is most likely a motive power move, Santa Fe 142 leads seven other Super Fleet Warbonnet engines on westbound Train #199 from Willow Springs, IL to Richmond, CA, seen here rushing past the station at Chillicothe, IL on February 23, 1993. The power consist is a GP-60M, B40-8W, a GP-60B and five more GP-60M’s. Motive power moves occur regularly; this is a way to balance power across the system. The five GP-60M’s would possibly be dropped at Kansas City.

Santa Fe 404, a General Electric U30CG, is leaving Ottawa, Kansas eastbound with the Tulsan in April 1966. The Tulsan was established in the late 1930s. It was a daily train each way for the 256-mile run between Kansas City, MO to Tulsa, OK, with connections to Chicago, IL. Facing declining revenue, the railroad petitioned the Interstate Commerce Commission to remove the Tulsan from service in 1968, but the request was rejected. The Tulsan continued to operate until all passenger train service on the Santa Fe, and almost all other railroads, was taken over by Amtrak on May 1, 1971.

≈ Santa Fe 3, an E-1A and E-1B, delivered in January 1938, leads westbound Train #21, the El Capitan with an eight-car consist working upgrade through Raton Pass, NM on May 12, 1940.

≈ Santa Fe 145 leads a westbound freight out of Amarillo, TX in June 1962. The power consist is all EMD Model FT’s. There are two A Units, one on each end and three B Units in the middle. These units, some approaching 18 to 20 years old, still have some useful miles in them, but within a few years, they will all be retired.

≈ Santa Fe 502, a B40-8W, in concert with a GP60M, is leading a hot westbound intermodal train through the forest two miles east of Bellemont, AZ on July 30, 1994. This stand of Ponderosa Pine west of Flagstaff, AZ, in the Coconino National Forest, is the largest anywhere in the world.

≈ It is August 16, 1968, and Santa Fe 358 and 403, a U28-CG and a U30-CG, both built by General Electric, are the power for this day’s Chief. As soon as they get clearance, the Chief will depart Chicago’s La Salle Street Station for Los Angeles, 2,223 miles away.

≈ Santa Fe 3751, a Class 3751 Heavy Mountain (4-8-4), is on an eastbound passenger special three miles east of Seligman, AZ on September 1, 1992. Built in 1927 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, it was the first Heavy Mountain on the Santa Fe Roster and the first ever built by Baldwin. It was rebuilt in 1938 and finished its career as an oil burner. It was retired in 1957 and in 1958 was donated for display. In 1986 3751 was sold to the San Bernardino Railroad Historical Society which committed to restoring it. Work completed, 3751 ran again under its own steam in 1991.

≈ Santa Fe 904 East is emerging from the smoky confines of Tunnel #5 in the Tehachapi Mountains at Cliff, CA on August 15, 1995. This is the hot eastbound Train #991 from Richmond, CA to Willow Springs, IL. The power for today’s train is all Super Fleet. 904 is a C40-8W. Trailing units are a B40-8W and three GP60M’s. It passed the photographers at 5:39 PM, running late.

≈ Santa Fe 2602 and 2604, two of six DT6-6-2000 center-cab transfer engines built in 1949 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, are lugging a freight through the yard at Ottawa, KS in November 1959. These two Baldwin center-cab engines were designed for transfer work, but occasionally a couple of these dinosaurs would escape the yard on a freight. All were off the roster by February 1962.

≈ Santa Fe 87 is on the point of Train #12, the Chicagoan. The all lightweight, eastbound train from Dallas, TX to Chicago, IL, is making a station stop at Lawrence, KS on December 21, 1955. The power for this train is all EMD: an E-8m, an E-8B and an F-7B. It is about 11:15AM, and within a few minutes they will be on their way.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

Available In 6/17/2024 12:08 PM

Seashells 2025 Calendar

$17.95

We have seashells by the seashore and to see them is to understand why Sally might be successful selling them. The old children’s rhyme may be a tongue-twister, but the shells are colorful and appealing. The Seashells 2025 wall calendar is like seeing the Amalfi coast in miniature, with bright, distinctive dwellings glowing in the sunshine along a wave-washed shore.

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Seashells featured in this edition include:

Many wonderful examples of nature’s unique ability to design with color, imaginative shapes, and sizes

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

Available In 6/17/2024 1:56 PM

Sierra Nevada 2025 Calendar

$17.95

Naturalist John Muir described the excitement of being in the Sierra Nevada by saying, “We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” Muir called the mountains “the grandest of all special temples of Nature.” The Sierra Nevada 2025 calendar reveals Muir’s “special temples of nature” in photographs of those remarkable mountain landscapes that continues to inspire us today.

This 2025 wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Locations featured in this edition include:
≈ On the east side of the Sierra Nevada, a frosty morning around Crowley Lake

≈ Thawing lake reflections at Bishop Creek Canyon

≈ The spring melt sends water rushing through Rock Creek Canyon

≈ Indian paintbrush blooming in McGee Creek Canyon

≈ Golden Trout Wilderness in the Southern Sierra Nevada

≈ Moonrise and glowing tufa at Mono Lake

≈ Fourth Recess Lake in the John Muir Wilderness

≈ Summer storm gathering over Thousand Island Lake, Ansel Adams Wilderness

≈ Gnarled bristlecone pine is among the oldest living things on the earth

≈ Fall leaves and a pink sunset reflection light up McGee Creek

≈ Golden aspen and the first signs of winter, Inyo National Forest

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

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Southern Pacific Railroad 2024 Wall Calendar

$15.95

Southern Pacific Railroad began with a simple idea: to connect San Francisco and San Diego, California, by rail. A century later, Southern Pacific had become one of the largest railroads in America, with lines that stretched from coast to coast (connecting to New York via Morgan Line steamships) and from the south to the northwest. In 1959, SP moved more ton-miles of freight than any other U.S. railroad. Engines featured here reach back to the era of SP steam, and forward to the diesels of the 1970s.

This 2024 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Locomotives and trains featured in this edition include:
√ Southern Pacific 4202 and 4440 are double-heading an outbound passenger special at Mission Tower, Los Angeles, California in January 1955. 4202 is a Class AC-8 (4-8-8-2) articulated, and 4440 is a Class GS-4 Northern (4-8-4) built in 1941 by the Lima Locomotive Works.
√ Southern Pacific 6047, an E9A and an E7B with Rock Island E8A and two E7B’s —all EMD locomotives— are leading Train #3, the Golden State Limited through Alhambra, California on February 24, 1967.
√ Southern Pacific 4468, a Class GS-6 Northern (4-8-4) built in 1943 by the Lima Locomotive Works has suffered a failure and has been cut off from its train.
√ Southern Pacific 8288 is leading a southbound consist of “oil cans” up Tehachapi Pass, seen here coming through Woodford, California at 2:17 p.m. on April 2, 1988.
√ Southern Pacific 9120, a Krause Maffei Model ML-4000 diesel hydraulic, assisted by 6450, an FP-7 and an F7B, is on the point of a railfan special at Oakland, California on April 30, 1967.
√ Southern Pacific 3205 is one of ten SDP-45’s purchased in 1967 to bolster SP’s passenger locomotive fleet which had aged substantially.
√ Southern Pacific F7A 6391 in a classic “black widow” paint scheme with an F7A-F7B-F7A are arriving at Los Angeles, California with Train #58, the Owl on July 31, 1960.
√ Southern Pacific 4743 is leading northbound commuter train #136 near Burlingame, California on August 1, 1955.
√ Southern Pacific 6024, a Class PA2, one of 23 painted in “daylight” colors, with another PA2 (6022), has been assigned to handle Train #28, the San Francisco Overland on September 3, 1953.
√ Southern Pacific 4449 and 4447 are double-headed on a passenger special near Palmdale, California on October 17, 1954. Both locomotives are Class GS-4 Northerns (4-8-4).
√ Southern Pacific 1824, one of three Class M-5 Moguls (2-6-0) built by the Sacramento Shops in 1917, has been called to pick up loaded lettuce cars at El Centro, California on November 27, 1954.
√ In late December 1974 near Mojave, California, Southern Pacific Tunnel Motor (SD40T-2, built by EMD) leads four other eastbound units on an early morning freight from Bakersfield.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2023

Southern Pacific Railroad 2025 Calendar

$17.95

Southern Pacific Railroad began with a simple idea: to connect San Francisco and San Diego, California, by rail. A century later, Southern Pacific had become one of the largest railroads in America, with lines that stretched from coast to coast (connecting to New York via Morgan Line steamships) and from the south to the northwest. In 1959, SP moved more ton-miles of freight than any other U.S. railroad. Southern Pacific Railroad 2025 calendar features engines and trains that reach back to the era of SP steam, and forward to the diesels of the 1970s.

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Locomotives and trains featured in this edition include:
≈ Southern Pacific 9 is a narrow gauge Ten-Wheeler (4-6-0) built in 1909 for the Nevada-California-Oregon Railroad. By 1928 it belonged to Southern Pacific. It was the final steam locomotive to haul revenue freight on the Slim Princess line between Laws and Keeler, CA, last seeing service in August 1959. It is being turned on the Armstrong turntable at Laws, CA in July 1959.

≈ Southern Pacific 9192-7562-9208 (an SD40T-2 Tunnel Motor, an SD45, and another Tunnel Motor) all in the ill-fated SPSF paint scheme, are leaving Spruce, CO southbound with D&RGW Train #128 on February 12, 1988. Santa Fe painted 306 locomotives in the red and yellow “merger” paint scheme; Southern Pacific only painted 96. The railroads had announced their intention to merge and requested Interstate Commerce Commission approval on March 23, 1984. ICC formally rejected the merger on July 25, 1986, stating restraint of trade. It turned out that beside lots of money being wasted, so was a lot of red and yellow paint.

≈ Southern Pacific locomotives 4427 and 4426, both Class GS-3 (4-8-4’s) built by the Lima Locomotive Works in 1937, are coming through Ilmon, CA, located 30 rail miles north of Tehachapi in March 1954. The train is northbound, and it could be the San Joaquin Daylight.

≈ Southern Pacific 4165, a Class AC-7 Cab Forward (4-8-8-2) built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1937, is leading a freight out of West Oakland, CA in March 1958. It would be retired just a few months after this trip. The AC-6, AC-7, AC-8, AC-10. AC-11 and AC-12. were all nearly identical. Only one was saved, the last one, 4294. It is displayed in spectacular fashion at the California Railroad Museum in Sacramento.

≈ Train #1, the Sunset Limited is at the San Antonio, TX depot on May 12, 1959. Power for this day’s train was Southern Pacific’s only E8A, 6018, an E9A in the Halloween paint scheme, and an E7B in gray paint. The Sunset Limited originated in New Orleans, LA, and the train’s final destination was Los Angeles, CA.

≈ Texas and New Orleans 179, one of eight AS-616 road switchers built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works and delivered in 1952, is switching at Fort Worth, TX on June 16, 1966. The Texas and New Orleans was a wholly owned subsidiary road of the Southern Pacific. These were dependable locomotives—the last of them was retired in 1969.

≈ Southern Pacific 631, one of three locomotives purchased for the Texas and New Orleans Railroad, is a Class P-13 Pacific (4-6-2) built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1928. It is seen here on First #5, the Argonaut, arriving at San Antonio, TX on July 9, 1944. This was the first section of this train, and at least one other section was following. The heavy passenger load was prompted by the demands of World War Two. 631 would remain in service until 1955, when it was replaced by new motive power purchases.

≈ Of all the trains that operated through the Tehachapi Mountains, the “Oil Cans” (train symbol BKDOU) was probably the most interesting. It was loaded at Saco, CA, north of Bakersfield, CA, and crossed the Tehachapi Range on its way to Dolores, CA, south of Long Beach, where it was unloaded. The consist was five locomotives, then four sets of 12 tank cars each, six helper engines, then two more 12-car sets. In total, the train carried 1,848,600 gallons of oil and weighed a total of 10,608 tons. Oil Cans ran from 1983 into 1997, when oil pipelines took over. In this image, five SP Tunnel Motors (SD-40T-2’s) lead the “Cans” through Woodford, CA, on August 13, 1990.There are six helper engines working 48 cars behind the leaders.

≈ On September 15, 1979, Southern Pacific 3200, an EMD SD45 with an SD40-2 trailing, is crossing the Benicia- Martinez Bridge. This 1.7-mile-long bridge, which was completed in 1962, towers almost 100 feet above the Carquinez Strait. It appears that the photographer took this picture from one of the “step ins” for pedestrians on the bridge.

≈ Here is Southern Pacific Class AC-9 3806 in fresh paint. SP purchased a dozen of these coal-burning “stack ahead” Yellowstone Type (2-8-8-4) locomotives from the Lima Locomotive Works in 1939. They were used extensively between Tucumcari, NM and El Paso, TX. In 1950, they were converted to oil and moved to the Modoc Line, running mostly between Sparks, NV and Alturas, CA. By the end of 1956, all were off the roster.

≈ In March 1978, Southern Pacific received four locomotives manufactured by Morrison-Knudsen at Boise, Idaho. These were TE70-4S locomotives, nicknamed “popsicles” because of their vibrant colors, a big change from Southern Pacific gray. Three of them are seen here on a freight near Colca, OR, on June 9, 1980. They were unreliable and did not seem to fit in well with the Southern Pacific. After nearly a decade trying, SP gave up, and the TE70-4Ss were scrapped.

≈ Southern Pacific 2745, one of 58 Class C-8 Consolidations (2-8-0) built in 1904 by the Schenectady Locomotive Company, is handling switching duties at Crescent Lake, OR on August 8, 1955. Two of the engines from this class were saved and are on display at Alturas and at Watsonville, CA, but 2745 was not one of them.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

Available In 6/17/2024 2:32 PM

Streetcars & Trolleys 2024 Wall Calendar

$15.95

Before automobiles and buses there were streetcars or trolleys in virtually every American city. Streetcars & Trolleys recalls that era through historic photographs from around the United States. Images from city systems featured include: Baltimore, Chicago, Minneapolis, New Orleans, San Diego, Yonkers, and more.

This 2024 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Streetcar lines and locations featured in this edition include:
√ Chicago, Aurora and Elgin Car 453 has stopped to pick up passengers at Batavia Junction,
Illinois in January 1951. 453 provided local service between Chicago and Aurora, Illinois.
√ Omaha and Council Bluffs Street Railway Snow Sweeper 024 is working eastbound on Farnham
Street, one of the busiest streets in Omaha, Nebraska on March 25, 1952.
√ Chicago Transit Authority Car 298 is on Chicago Avenue at Kedzie on March 13, 1951.
√ San Diego Electric Railway Car 421 is at Balboa Park in San Diego, California on April 22, 1949.
The rail line shut down a few weeks later.
√ The Third Avenue Railway System (TARS) was built to extra-large proportions. Here is Car 397 coming through downtown Yonkers, New York on July 12, 1952.
√ This is Milwaukee Rapid Transit and Speedrail Company Car 66, seen here at West Junction, Wisconsin on June 14, 1951.
√ Baltimore Transit Car 5745 is on the Ellicott City Shuttle at Catonsville, Maryland on July 1, 1951.
√ Sand Springs Railway Car 72 is arriving at Tulsa, Oklahoma in September 1954.
√ Twin Cities Rapid Transit Lines PCC Car 433 is in the Como Park area of Minneapolis,
Minnesota in September 1953.
√ New Orleans Public Service War Bond Car 832 is on Route 19 at New Orleans, Louisiana on
October 17, 1943.
√ Lehigh Valley Transit Company Car 704 is at the 69th Street Terminal at Allentown,
Pennsylvania on September 7, 1948.
√ Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Car 118 is at the Crandic Yard at Iowa City, Iowa in the winter of 1948.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2023

Those Remarkable Trains 2024 Wall Calendar

$15.95

This remarkable collection of classic steam locomotives and trains offers thundering power and great style through more than 50 years of railroading. Locomotives include: a Rogers-built Consolidation 2-8-0 from 1905, Boston and Maine Pacific 4-6-2s from 1911, C & N W streamlined Hudson 4-6-4 from 1938, Burlington’s Morning Zephyr, and more. Don’t miss the call!

This 2024 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Locomotives and railroads featured in this edition include:
• Gulf Mobile and Ohio Alco FA-FB-FA set
• DRG Krause-Maffei Diesel Hydraulics
• Burlington’s Morning Zephyr
• N&W pair of Class A 2-6-6-4s
• Western Maryland Baldwin 2-8-0s from 1921
• Boston and Maine Pacific 4-6-2s from 1911
• C & N W streamlined Hudson 4-6-4 from 1938
• Union Pacific Big Boy 4003
• Rogers-built Consolidation 2-8-0 from 1905
• Western Pacific’s California Zephyr

© 2023 Tide-mark Press

Warbirds 2024 Wall Calendar

$15.95

New battles require new tools, and Warbirds 2024 features a century of air power innovation. The WWI Bristol F.2b led to WWII Spitfires, the U.S. B-17, and the German Bf 109. More speed and power arrived with jet aircraft like the F-15 Strike Eagle, the F-22 Raptor, and the Eurofighter Typhoon. Don’t miss the evolving action in the air!.
This 2024 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Aircraft and events featured in this edition include:
• The mainstay of the U.S. ground attack interdictor force, the F-15-E Strike Eagle has been in service since 1988.
• The epitome of a modern jet-age aircraft, this F-16 Fighting Falcon effortlessly demonstrates the startling power of contemporary combat aircraft.
• Two RAF Spitfires, two of the “few,” take a deep breath and turn in to confront an incoming Luftwaffe raid in 1940.
• Just inches from completing another sortie, a B-17F settles down alongside the strip at Bassingbourn where the 91st Battle Group of the U.S. 9th Air Force operated from October 1942 until 1945.
• Messerschmitt Bf 109s drop down on a pair of RAF Hurricanes in a classic wing-over maneuver to fly out of the sun and attack their prey.
• Operated by more than 12 airlines and eventually the German Luftwaffe from the early 1930s, the Junkers Ju 52 was a groundbreaking transport aircraft.
• The Ryan PT-22 Recruit was the primary U.S. flight trainer at the start of World War II and the first monoplane aircraft for this purpose.
• The Eurofighter Typhoon is the main operational fighting aircraft of the RAF and six other Western nations.
• The Bristol F2b was the original fighter-bomber and saw service in the later part of World War I.
• This P-51 was based at RAF Duxford, and is finished in the livery of the 84th Fighter Squadron.
• The F-22 Raptor is an air-superiority fighter developed for the USAF capable of exceeding Mach 2.0 and operating at heights exceeding 65,000 feet.
Published by Tide-mark Press © 2023

Yosemite National Park 2024 Wall Calendar

$15.95

John Muir lived in the Yosemite Valley, what would become Yosemite National Park, from 1868 to 1873. The attention he won for Yosemite ensured its place as a National Park. Muir wrote, “Nowhere will you see the majestic operations of nature more clearly revealed beside the frailest, most gentle and peaceful things.” The Yosemite calendar shares the spirit of awe Muir felt so clearly almost 150 years ago.

This 2024 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Yosemite places featured in this edition include:
~ Frosted Bridalveil Fall
~ Fresh snow at Tenaya Creek and Mirror Lake
~ Road in the valley at Yosemite
~ Cathedral Lake and Peak, Yosemite Wilderness
~ El Capitan, Half Dome, and Bridalveil Fall, from Discovery View
~ Morning light awakens the meadow grasses and peeks through the oak trees
~ Vernal Fall on the Merced River
~ El Capitan and the Merced River
~ Giant granite boulders
~ Autumn oaks alongside Tenaya Creek
~ Half Dome reflection at Yosemite National Park
~ Deer in the meadow and Yosemite Falls, Yosemite National Park

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2023

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