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Santa Fe Railway 2025 Calendar

$17.95

Chartered just before the Civil War, during the next three decades the tracks of the Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe reached from Chicago to Los Angeles. Santa Fe Railway trains provided the country’s most appealing passenger service and for shippers, the most innovative intermodal freight service in America. The Santa Fe Railway 2025 calendar features classic steam and diesel locomotives working on the ATSF.

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Locomotives and trains featured in this edition include:
≈ Santa Fe 38C (two F-7A’s and three F-7B’s) lead Train #2, the eastbound San Francisco Chief into Chillicothe, IL in January 1970.

≈ Santa Fe 81, an E-8m, is on a southbound Chief connection train, making a station stop at Pueblo, CO, in February 1966. 81 was rebuilt from an early E Unit in 1953, and for several years was in longhaul passenger train service, such as the Super Chief and others. As seen here, running as Train #201, It mostly completed its career on the 183-mile-long Chief Connection from Denver to La Junta, Colorado. It was retired in 1970.

≈ In what is most likely a motive power move, Santa Fe 142 leads seven other Super Fleet Warbonnet engines on westbound Train #199 from Willow Springs, IL to Richmond, CA, seen here rushing past the station at Chillicothe, IL on February 23, 1993. The power consist is a GP-60M, B40-8W, a GP-60B and five more GP-60M’s. Motive power moves occur regularly; this is a way to balance power across the system. The five GP-60M’s would possibly be dropped at Kansas City.

Santa Fe 404, a General Electric U30CG, is leaving Ottawa, Kansas eastbound with the Tulsan in April 1966. The Tulsan was established in the late 1930s. It was a daily train each way for the 256-mile run between Kansas City, MO to Tulsa, OK, with connections to Chicago, IL. Facing declining revenue, the railroad petitioned the Interstate Commerce Commission to remove the Tulsan from service in 1968, but the request was rejected. The Tulsan continued to operate until all passenger train service on the Santa Fe, and almost all other railroads, was taken over by Amtrak on May 1, 1971.

≈ Santa Fe 3, an E-1A and E-1B, delivered in January 1938, leads westbound Train #21, the El Capitan with an eight-car consist working upgrade through Raton Pass, NM on May 12, 1940.

≈ Santa Fe 145 leads a westbound freight out of Amarillo, TX in June 1962. The power consist is all EMD Model FT’s. There are two A Units, one on each end and three B Units in the middle. These units, some approaching 18 to 20 years old, still have some useful miles in them, but within a few years, they will all be retired.

≈ Santa Fe 502, a B40-8W, in concert with a GP60M, is leading a hot westbound intermodal train through the forest two miles east of Bellemont, AZ on July 30, 1994. This stand of Ponderosa Pine west of Flagstaff, AZ, in the Coconino National Forest, is the largest anywhere in the world.

≈ It is August 16, 1968, and Santa Fe 358 and 403, a U28-CG and a U30-CG, both built by General Electric, are the power for this day’s Chief. As soon as they get clearance, the Chief will depart Chicago’s La Salle Street Station for Los Angeles, 2,223 miles away.

≈ Santa Fe 3751, a Class 3751 Heavy Mountain (4-8-4), is on an eastbound passenger special three miles east of Seligman, AZ on September 1, 1992. Built in 1927 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, it was the first Heavy Mountain on the Santa Fe Roster and the first ever built by Baldwin. It was rebuilt in 1938 and finished its career as an oil burner. It was retired in 1957 and in 1958 was donated for display. In 1986 3751 was sold to the San Bernardino Railroad Historical Society which committed to restoring it. Work completed, 3751 ran again under its own steam in 1991.

≈ Santa Fe 904 East is emerging from the smoky confines of Tunnel #5 in the Tehachapi Mountains at Cliff, CA on August 15, 1995. This is the hot eastbound Train #991 from Richmond, CA to Willow Springs, IL. The power for today’s train is all Super Fleet. 904 is a C40-8W. Trailing units are a B40-8W and three GP60M’s. It passed the photographers at 5:39 PM, running late.

≈ Santa Fe 2602 and 2604, two of six DT6-6-2000 center-cab transfer engines built in 1949 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, are lugging a freight through the yard at Ottawa, KS in November 1959. These two Baldwin center-cab engines were designed for transfer work, but occasionally a couple of these dinosaurs would escape the yard on a freight. All were off the roster by February 1962.

≈ Santa Fe 87 is on the point of Train #12, the Chicagoan. The all lightweight, eastbound train from Dallas, TX to Chicago, IL, is making a station stop at Lawrence, KS on December 21, 1955. The power for this train is all EMD: an E-8m, an E-8B and an F-7B. It is about 11:15AM, and within a few minutes they will be on their way.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

Available In 6/17/2024 12:08 PM

Seashells 2025 Calendar

$17.95

We have seashells by the seashore and to see them is to understand why Sally might be successful selling them. The old children’s rhyme may be a tongue-twister, but the shells are colorful and appealing. The Seashells 2025 wall calendar is like seeing the Amalfi coast in miniature, with bright, distinctive dwellings glowing in the sunshine along a wave-washed shore.

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Seashells featured in this edition include:

Many wonderful examples of nature’s unique ability to design with color, imaginative shapes, and sizes

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

Available In 6/17/2024 1:56 PM

Sierra Nevada 2025 Calendar

$17.95

Naturalist John Muir described the excitement of being in the Sierra Nevada by saying, “We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” Muir called the mountains “the grandest of all special temples of Nature.” The Sierra Nevada 2025 calendar reveals Muir’s “special temples of nature” in photographs of those remarkable mountain landscapes that continues to inspire us today.

This 2025 wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Locations featured in this edition include:
≈ On the east side of the Sierra Nevada, a frosty morning around Crowley Lake

≈ Thawing lake reflections at Bishop Creek Canyon

≈ The spring melt sends water rushing through Rock Creek Canyon

≈ Indian paintbrush blooming in McGee Creek Canyon

≈ Golden Trout Wilderness in the Southern Sierra Nevada

≈ Moonrise and glowing tufa at Mono Lake

≈ Fourth Recess Lake in the John Muir Wilderness

≈ Summer storm gathering over Thousand Island Lake, Ansel Adams Wilderness

≈ Gnarled bristlecone pine is among the oldest living things on the earth

≈ Fall leaves and a pink sunset reflection light up McGee Creek

≈ Golden aspen and the first signs of winter, Inyo National Forest

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

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Southern Pacific Railroad 2024 Wall Calendar

$15.95

Southern Pacific Railroad began with a simple idea: to connect San Francisco and San Diego, California, by rail. A century later, Southern Pacific had become one of the largest railroads in America, with lines that stretched from coast to coast (connecting to New York via Morgan Line steamships) and from the south to the northwest. In 1959, SP moved more ton-miles of freight than any other U.S. railroad. Engines featured here reach back to the era of SP steam, and forward to the diesels of the 1970s.

This 2024 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Locomotives and trains featured in this edition include:
√ Southern Pacific 4202 and 4440 are double-heading an outbound passenger special at Mission Tower, Los Angeles, California in January 1955. 4202 is a Class AC-8 (4-8-8-2) articulated, and 4440 is a Class GS-4 Northern (4-8-4) built in 1941 by the Lima Locomotive Works.
√ Southern Pacific 6047, an E9A and an E7B with Rock Island E8A and two E7B’s —all EMD locomotives— are leading Train #3, the Golden State Limited through Alhambra, California on February 24, 1967.
√ Southern Pacific 4468, a Class GS-6 Northern (4-8-4) built in 1943 by the Lima Locomotive Works has suffered a failure and has been cut off from its train.
√ Southern Pacific 8288 is leading a southbound consist of “oil cans” up Tehachapi Pass, seen here coming through Woodford, California at 2:17 p.m. on April 2, 1988.
√ Southern Pacific 9120, a Krause Maffei Model ML-4000 diesel hydraulic, assisted by 6450, an FP-7 and an F7B, is on the point of a railfan special at Oakland, California on April 30, 1967.
√ Southern Pacific 3205 is one of ten SDP-45’s purchased in 1967 to bolster SP’s passenger locomotive fleet which had aged substantially.
√ Southern Pacific F7A 6391 in a classic “black widow” paint scheme with an F7A-F7B-F7A are arriving at Los Angeles, California with Train #58, the Owl on July 31, 1960.
√ Southern Pacific 4743 is leading northbound commuter train #136 near Burlingame, California on August 1, 1955.
√ Southern Pacific 6024, a Class PA2, one of 23 painted in “daylight” colors, with another PA2 (6022), has been assigned to handle Train #28, the San Francisco Overland on September 3, 1953.
√ Southern Pacific 4449 and 4447 are double-headed on a passenger special near Palmdale, California on October 17, 1954. Both locomotives are Class GS-4 Northerns (4-8-4).
√ Southern Pacific 1824, one of three Class M-5 Moguls (2-6-0) built by the Sacramento Shops in 1917, has been called to pick up loaded lettuce cars at El Centro, California on November 27, 1954.
√ In late December 1974 near Mojave, California, Southern Pacific Tunnel Motor (SD40T-2, built by EMD) leads four other eastbound units on an early morning freight from Bakersfield.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2023

Southern Pacific Railroad 2025 Calendar

$17.95

Southern Pacific Railroad began with a simple idea: to connect San Francisco and San Diego, California, by rail. A century later, Southern Pacific had become one of the largest railroads in America, with lines that stretched from coast to coast (connecting to New York via Morgan Line steamships) and from the south to the northwest. In 1959, SP moved more ton-miles of freight than any other U.S. railroad. Southern Pacific Railroad 2025 calendar features engines and trains that reach back to the era of SP steam, and forward to the diesels of the 1970s.

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Locomotives and trains featured in this edition include:
≈ Southern Pacific 9 is a narrow gauge Ten-Wheeler (4-6-0) built in 1909 for the Nevada-California-Oregon Railroad. By 1928 it belonged to Southern Pacific. It was the final steam locomotive to haul revenue freight on the Slim Princess line between Laws and Keeler, CA, last seeing service in August 1959. It is being turned on the Armstrong turntable at Laws, CA in July 1959.

≈ Southern Pacific 9192-7562-9208 (an SD40T-2 Tunnel Motor, an SD45, and another Tunnel Motor) all in the ill-fated SPSF paint scheme, are leaving Spruce, CO southbound with D&RGW Train #128 on February 12, 1988. Santa Fe painted 306 locomotives in the red and yellow “merger” paint scheme; Southern Pacific only painted 96. The railroads had announced their intention to merge and requested Interstate Commerce Commission approval on March 23, 1984. ICC formally rejected the merger on July 25, 1986, stating restraint of trade. It turned out that beside lots of money being wasted, so was a lot of red and yellow paint.

≈ Southern Pacific locomotives 4427 and 4426, both Class GS-3 (4-8-4’s) built by the Lima Locomotive Works in 1937, are coming through Ilmon, CA, located 30 rail miles north of Tehachapi in March 1954. The train is northbound, and it could be the San Joaquin Daylight.

≈ Southern Pacific 4165, a Class AC-7 Cab Forward (4-8-8-2) built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1937, is leading a freight out of West Oakland, CA in March 1958. It would be retired just a few months after this trip. The AC-6, AC-7, AC-8, AC-10. AC-11 and AC-12. were all nearly identical. Only one was saved, the last one, 4294. It is displayed in spectacular fashion at the California Railroad Museum in Sacramento.

≈ Train #1, the Sunset Limited is at the San Antonio, TX depot on May 12, 1959. Power for this day’s train was Southern Pacific’s only E8A, 6018, an E9A in the Halloween paint scheme, and an E7B in gray paint. The Sunset Limited originated in New Orleans, LA, and the train’s final destination was Los Angeles, CA.

≈ Texas and New Orleans 179, one of eight AS-616 road switchers built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works and delivered in 1952, is switching at Fort Worth, TX on June 16, 1966. The Texas and New Orleans was a wholly owned subsidiary road of the Southern Pacific. These were dependable locomotives—the last of them was retired in 1969.

≈ Southern Pacific 631, one of three locomotives purchased for the Texas and New Orleans Railroad, is a Class P-13 Pacific (4-6-2) built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1928. It is seen here on First #5, the Argonaut, arriving at San Antonio, TX on July 9, 1944. This was the first section of this train, and at least one other section was following. The heavy passenger load was prompted by the demands of World War Two. 631 would remain in service until 1955, when it was replaced by new motive power purchases.

≈ Of all the trains that operated through the Tehachapi Mountains, the “Oil Cans” (train symbol BKDOU) was probably the most interesting. It was loaded at Saco, CA, north of Bakersfield, CA, and crossed the Tehachapi Range on its way to Dolores, CA, south of Long Beach, where it was unloaded. The consist was five locomotives, then four sets of 12 tank cars each, six helper engines, then two more 12-car sets. In total, the train carried 1,848,600 gallons of oil and weighed a total of 10,608 tons. Oil Cans ran from 1983 into 1997, when oil pipelines took over. In this image, five SP Tunnel Motors (SD-40T-2’s) lead the “Cans” through Woodford, CA, on August 13, 1990.There are six helper engines working 48 cars behind the leaders.

≈ On September 15, 1979, Southern Pacific 3200, an EMD SD45 with an SD40-2 trailing, is crossing the Benicia- Martinez Bridge. This 1.7-mile-long bridge, which was completed in 1962, towers almost 100 feet above the Carquinez Strait. It appears that the photographer took this picture from one of the “step ins” for pedestrians on the bridge.

≈ Here is Southern Pacific Class AC-9 3806 in fresh paint. SP purchased a dozen of these coal-burning “stack ahead” Yellowstone Type (2-8-8-4) locomotives from the Lima Locomotive Works in 1939. They were used extensively between Tucumcari, NM and El Paso, TX. In 1950, they were converted to oil and moved to the Modoc Line, running mostly between Sparks, NV and Alturas, CA. By the end of 1956, all were off the roster.

≈ In March 1978, Southern Pacific received four locomotives manufactured by Morrison-Knudsen at Boise, Idaho. These were TE70-4S locomotives, nicknamed “popsicles” because of their vibrant colors, a big change from Southern Pacific gray. Three of them are seen here on a freight near Colca, OR, on June 9, 1980. They were unreliable and did not seem to fit in well with the Southern Pacific. After nearly a decade trying, SP gave up, and the TE70-4Ss were scrapped.

≈ Southern Pacific 2745, one of 58 Class C-8 Consolidations (2-8-0) built in 1904 by the Schenectady Locomotive Company, is handling switching duties at Crescent Lake, OR on August 8, 1955. Two of the engines from this class were saved and are on display at Alturas and at Watsonville, CA, but 2745 was not one of them.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

Available In 6/17/2024 2:32 PM

Streetcars & Trolleys 2025 Wall Calendar

$17.95

Before automobiles and buses there were streetcars or trolleys in virtually every American city. Streetcars & Trolleys 2025 calendar recalls that era through historic photographs from around the United States. Images from city systems featured include: Baltimore, Chicago, Minneapolis, New Orleans, San Diego, Yonkers, and more.

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Streetcar lines and locations featured in this edition include:
√ The motorman throwing a switch for Lehigh Valley Transit Car 1007 seen here at Allentown, Pennsylvania, in February of 1950. Car 1007 was purchased secondhand from the Cincinnati and Lake Erie in 1938, and it was retired from service on November 14, 1951.

Omaha and Council Bluffs Car 1019, built by the J.G. Brill Company in 1917, is on the single-track wye at 45th and Bedford, Omaha, Nebraska on February 22, 1955. Streetcar service was discontinued later that year.

Chicago Transit Authority Car 1725 has turned south from Cermak Road, crossing under the C.B. & Q. underpass at Trumbull Avenue, Chicago, Illinois on June 11, 1951.

√ The Milwaukee Electric Railway and Light Company Car 1142 has stopped to pick up a passenger in downtown Waukesha, Wisconsin in September 1949. Car 1142 was built by the St. Louis Car Company in 1927, a 48-seat, all-steel car. In 1949 it was sold to Speedrail and was removed from the TMER&L roster.

Twin Cities Rapid Transit PCC Car 436 is on Hennepin at Lyndale, Minneapolis, Minnesota on June 12, 1953. This must have been a prosperous operation at this time. Note that there is someone in every seat.

Fort Collins Municipal Railway Birney 20 is in service at Fort Collins, Colorado on June 23, 1951. This line opened in December of 1907 and operated with Birney Cars (six of them) until 1951, when poor ridership discouraged further operation. In 1977, however, Car 21 was rebuilt and made operational. The City of Fort Collins allowed replacement of a mile and a half of track, all done with private funding. The line operates with Cars 21 and 25 on some weekends and for special events.

Denver and Intermountain Car .03 is coming out of the Tramway Loop in downtown Denver, CO on July 2, 1950. The Denver and Intermountain used a decimal point in the numbering of their cars.

Southern Iowa Freight Motor 100 is stopped at the Moravia, Iowa depot on August 22, 1954. This freight-only short line would limp along for much longer than expected, with the last train operating on July 18, 1967, after which all operations ceased.

District of Columbia Transit PCC Car 1570 Is passing 15th and H Streets NW, Washington, D.C. on September 6, 1958.

Los Angeles Railway PCC Car 3031 is on the Pico Line, passing the A and B Market at First and Clarence, Los Angeles, California on October 2, 1951.

Illinois Terminal Car 282 is leaving Morton, Illinois southbound on November 1, 1952. Car 282 was built by the St. Louis Car Company in May 1913, and was in service for forty years. It was scrapped by Hyman-Michaels in October 1953.

Fort Dodge, Des Moines and Southern Combine 74, built in 1913, is at Des Moines, Iowa, this road’s southern terminal on November 1, 1953. The Fort Dodge and Des Moines line was 86 miles long, with Boone, Iowa about in the middle. It was noted for its 2,179-long, 182-foot-high bridge crossing the Des Moines River. Regularly scheduled interurban service was terminated on August 31, 1955.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

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Those Remarkable Trains 2025 Calendar

$17.95

The unique collection of classic steam and early diesel locomotives in Those Remarkable Trains 2025 calendar offers thundering power and great style through more than 50 years of railroading. Locomotives include: a C&IM Baldwin 2-10-2 from 1926, a Lehigh Valley Alco PA-1, an Alco Mikado (2-8-2) from 1924, a unique Baldwin coal-fired, steam turbine electric from 1954, and more. Don’t miss the call!

This 2025 wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Locomotives and railroads featured in this edition include:
Boston and Maine 3809, an E-7A, built by EMD in 1946, is passing under a covered bridge at Troy, NY on January 5, 1958. This was Train #67, a Sunday-only train, The Greylock. Arrival time per the timetable was 1:25 PM, but 3809 was running a little late. The photographer noted the time he took the slide as 1:59 PM. The covered bridge was built in 1885. An act of arson served as its demise in 1963.

≈ The Chicago and Illinois Midland Railway was primarily a coal hauler operating 121 miles between Peoria and Taylorville, Illinois. Rather than buying pricy new diesels, the Midland purchased used steam engines from other railroads that were in the process of dieselizing. Engine 705, seen here at Springfield, IL on July 3, 1954, was one of nine purchased from the Atlantic Coast Line. It was a 2-10-2, built in 1926 by Baldwin Locomotive Works. The Midland renumbered it 755 and placed it in service in November 1953. It would be set aside and scrapped in December 1955.

≈ The Toledo, Peoria and Western Railroad was a Midwestern line that operated between Mapleton, IL (west of Peoria) and Logansport, IN. EMD had a four-unit demonstrator set of F3’s, an A-B-B-A. In 1946, the TP&W bought half of the set, an F3A and an F3B. They then installed a cab on the B unit. This gave them more operating flexibility. Here is the 100, the original F3A, on Train #21, a westbound freight, stopped for switching at Fairbury, IL on February 23, 1955. This image was taken by TP&W dispatcher Monty Powell.

≈ It is 1:00 PM on May 21, 1958 and Chicago, Indianapolis and Louisville engine 82-A is pulling out of La Salle Street Station, Chicago, IL with Train #5, The Thoroughbred. It is on its way to Louisville, KY. Engine 82-A is an F-3A, purchased from EMD in 1947. Monon painted its passenger F-Units in Indiana University red and white colors; freight F-Units were painted in Purdue University black and gold. Monon was one of the first large railroads to eliminate steam power, doing so by 1949. By 1967, The Thoroughbred was the last Monon passenger train in service, but on September 29, 1967 all passenger service on the Monon ended.

≈ Here is a very rarely photographed locomotive: “Jawn Henry.” It is Norfolk and Western 2300, a steam turbine electric coal burner built by Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton in 1954. It was a monster, weighing in ready to roll at 1,182,000 pounds. 2300 went into service in June 1954. It was experimental, and various problems developed. It was a one-of-a-kind locomotive, requiring special handling. After experimenting with it in several applications, 2300 was assigned as a rear-end helper on coal trains running eastbound up the Blue Ridge grade. When the turbine failed on November 30, 1957, the engine was doomed. It was retired a few weeks later.

Lehigh Valley 606 (two Alco PA-1’s) are on Train #29, the John Wilkes making a station stop at Mauch Chunk, PA (The town was renamed in 1954 after Olympic athlete Jim Thorpe, who is buried there.) Lehigh Valley purchased 14 of these PA-1’s in 1948, but the line’s passenger service was poorly patronized. The flagship train, the Black Diamond made its last run on May 11, 1959. On February 3, 1961, the John Wilkes made its last run, and the next day the Maple Leaf was removed from service. The PA’s were transferred to freight service, a role for which they were poorly suited. During the next four years, all of them were removed from the roster; 606, the last of these locomotives still in service, was traded to Alco for new power.

Grand Trunk Western 3752, a Class S-3-c stoker-equipped Mikado (2-8-2) built by the American Locomotive Company in 1924, is on an empty gravel train (the Oxford stone train) at Oxford, MI, location of the largest gravel pit in the world. The Mikados worked as all-purpose locomotives for the Grand Trunk Western, even running in passenger train service. 3752 would be removed from service in 1960 and was scrapped in June 1961.

Atlantic Coast Line 356 (two EMD F-7A’s) are on a freight at the Live Oak, FL, depot in the summer of 1955. These F-7A’s were delivered to the ACL in February of 1949 in their distinctive (and expensive to maintain) silver and purple paint scheme. The president of ACL, McDowell Davis, liked the colors and their artful application on the line’s diesels. He retired in 1957 and as soon as he did, the much more conservative black with yellow striping began to show up with great regularity.

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy 9915-A and an identical unit are about twenty minutes and ten miles south of Minneapolis, MN, with Train #22, the Morning Zephyr on September 28, 1957. The two sleek EMD E-5A’s are leading their train out of St. Paul, MN, en route to an on-time arrival at Chicago Union Station at 2:15 PM.

≈ On October 13, 1996, Chicago and North Western 8605 and 8604, both General Electric Model C44-8W’s, part of a 130-unit order delivered in 1993, are on the approach to Dale, WY with an empty soda ash hopper train returning to the Green River, WY area. All C&NW stock was acquired by the Union Pacific on April 27, 1995; merger followed on June 28, 1995. Regardless of mergers, those three-year-old locomotives look great in this setting.

Union Pacific 5526, a Santa Fe Type 2-10-2, is on the point of a heavy westbound manifest freight helping Union Pacific 3951 Challenger, a 4-6-6-4 built by the American Locomotive Company in 1942. They are passing Otto, WY, a siding about 16 miles west of Cheyenne.

Great Northern 436 is leading a freight at Newport, WA on December 10, 1953. 436 was a four-unit, 6,000-horsepower Model F3A-F3B-F3B-F3A set purchased in September 1948. All were traded in to EMD in 1967 and 1968.

 

© 2024 Tide-mark Press

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Union Pacific 2025 Calendar

$17.95

The Union Pacific 2025 calendar features locomotives that made pioneering transcontinental rail service possible. Running freight through half of America meant long consists hauled by some of the largest locomotives ever built. From the steam era, a Union Pacific Type 4-12-2 from 1930, a Santa Fe Type TTT 2-10-2 from 1923, Big Boy 4018 (4-8-8-4) from 1942, on to 8,500 h.p. Super Tubine #14, and more. Roll on!

This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Locomotives and trains featured in this edition include:
Union Pacific 3565 and another SD40-2 are leading a single-car eastbound Sidney, Nebraska local through a roaring ground blizzard at Durham, Wyoming, 13 miles east of Cheyenne on March 14, 1990. 3565 is on the south track; a close examination of the image will reveal the northbound track, sort of. This is bad weather at its finest.

Union Pacific 3802 and 3995 are on a double-headed westbound freight three miles east of Granite, Wyoming on February 1, 1953. 3802 was the third Challenger built (1936) and 3995 was the fifth from the last one (1943), both by the American Locomotive Company. This image was made shortly before the #3 Track between Speer and Dale, Wyoming was placed in service. Prior to that, a manifest freight could become a dispatcher’s nightmare, but most of the time the traffic could be spread out with judicious use of sidings to keep the hotter trains moving.

Union Pacific 828, a Class FEF-2 (4-8-4, second order) is on the approach to Buford, Wyoming with Mail Train #6 eastbound on March 30, 1952. The FEF-2 Class consisted of fifteen locomotives numbered from 820 to 834, built by Alco from an order placed in 1939. All were coal burners (converted later to burn oil), and part of the second of three orders totaling 45 locomotives. By 1961 only 844 was still operable. It remains available today for special trains, renumbered 8444 at first in deference to a new GP-30, but now carrying its original number: 844.

Union Pacific 9062, seen here on a freight at Valley, Nebraska on June 19, 1955, was one of a unique class of 88 locomotives. They were three-cylinder engines with a 4-12-2 wheel arrangement and the longest rigid frame of any locomotives anywhere. Known as the Union Pacific type, they were built by the American Locomotive Company in 1929 and 1930. 87 of them were still in service in 1954. These locomotives were expensive to maintain, but UP had a tremendous investment in them, so they remained in service until late 1954. All were set aside by late 1955, and the sole survivor, 9000, was saved and is on display in Pomona, California.

≈ Union Pacific 6294 (three SD-60M’s and a C44-9W) is leading a westbound North Platte—Seattle Expedited train (SECSZ) two miles east of Granite, Wyoming on March 6, 1992.

Union Pacific Challengers 3712 and 3715 lead a 77-car eastbound freight near Baxter, Wyoming on June 15, 1959. Baxter is located 19 miles east of Green River. Scenes like this one taken by master photographer Jack Pfeifer (who spent his working career as a claims agent with the Union Pacific) will become impossible to see as all steam locomotives would be set aside by the late fall of 1959. Both 3712 and 3715 were scrapped that autumn.

Union Pacific Gas Turbine 54, one of a class of ten, is leading an eastbound freight out of Ogden, Utah on July 22, 1958. These units were delivered as a single unit with a self-contained fuel tank in 1952. In July 1956 an auxiliary fuel tank was added to extend their operating range. (The auxiliary tanks came from 9000-series 4-12-2’s that had been scrapped.) By the middle of 1963 all ten turbines would be off the roster.

Union Pacific Super Turbine 14 is bringing an eastbound manifest freight through the Laramie, Wyoming yard in August 1968. Turbine 14 was delivered to the UP by General Electric early in 1961. UP had 30 of them on their roster, all rated at 8,500 horsepower. They were used primarily between North Platte, Nebraska and Ogden, Utah. The escalating cost of Bunker C fuel, coupled with increasing mechanical difficulties, saw units being set aside, as diesels once again could haul more freight at a lower cost. All were off the roster by early February 1970.

Union Pacific 3800 was the first of 105 4-6-6-4 Challengers built by the American Locomotive Company between 1936 and 1944. Here it is on September 18, 1956, in work train service. It sits in the 6,336-foot-long center siding at the east end of Hermosa, Wyoming, waiting for the main line to clear. 3800 would remain in service for another couple of years, mainly working around Cheyenne and hauling ballast trains.

Union Pacific 4018, a ponderous 4-8-8-4 Big Boy, is leading an eastbound 103-car freight out of Green River, Wyoming on October 12, 1957. The first 20 Big Boys were built by the American Locomotive Company. The first one, 4000, was delivered at Council Bluffs, Iowa in September 1941. A second order for five more would follow in 1942 and 1943. UP got their money’s worth out of 4018. It went into service in 1942, and it was set aside in 1958. Despite a relatively short service life —a little over sixteen years— it was operated 1,037,123 miles. Eight Big Boys were donated to museums and for display, but 4018 was not among them. It went to scrap in 1962.

≈ Here is a view of one of the busiest places on the Union Pacific as well as one of the most important. This is the mammoth Cheyenne, Wyoming fuel facility. During the steam era, day or night, summer or winter or any time in between, locomotives took on fuel and water; minor running repairs were also performed here. In this view are Big Boy 4002 and locomotive 5301, a Class T-T-T (2-10-2) built in 1923 by the American Locomotive Company being prepared for service. Soon, both locomotives would be heading out of town, and other engines would be under the coal chute.

≈ Union Pacific Consolidation (2-8-0) is hard at work, assisting with the 1956 sugar beet harvest, delivering many carloads of beets to several Great Western Sugar Company plants located in northeastern Colorado and surrounding states. It is December 8, 1956, and 6072 is picking up cars at Gill, Colorado. (Gill is located about ten miles northeast of Greeley.) 6072 was delivered to UP in 1908 and served for 49 years. It was retired in 1957 and donated for display to Fort Riley, Kansas, where it remains today.

 

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

Available In 6/17/2024 11:02 AM

Volcano 2025 Calendar

$17.95

The Volcano 2025 calendar features images by Brad White who travels around the world taking the hottest pictures anywhere. His remarkable photographs from inside volcanos take you as close to the fiery lava as it is possible to be without being broiled alive. No fire-proof suit needed here, just join the adventure.

This 2025 wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size

Photographs featured in the calendar include:

√ The eastern rim of the Marum crater (4,377 feet) overlooks the lava lake 1,000 feet below. This shot is special because the crater— formerly the main vent of the shield volcano Ambrym, an island in the archipelago of Vanuatu—collapsed during an eruption and no longer exists. When active, the lava lake pumped out a continuous stream of sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas and aerosols of sulphuric acid which, when mixed with moisture, created acid rain that caused considerable crop damage on the island. On the lower right is the main ledge halfway down the crater wall where we would rest before abseiling the final section to the crater floor. It was a dangerous descent as each movement down the crater wall could cause rocks to dislodge. Besides the danger of being struck and injured, the falling rocks could also cut the lines that we depended on to safely get down and then back out of the crater.

√ During earlier trips to Marum, I noticed an area inside the crater where I could get a shot that lined up the lava lake with one of our team members for scale. It was a very narrow ledge about 300 feet down the northern wall. Even though there was a vertical drop of 600 feet, the ledge became both a testing and training area for us using the gear we were taking inside. We found that wearing the heat-proximity suit severely limited our visibility and maneuverability,
so it was only worn closer to the lava lake’s edge. What makes the images of Marum even more special, is that the lava lake no longer exists because a volcanic event blocked the magma chamber and covered the area in rockfall.

√ Inside the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is Nyiragongo, one of the world’s largest craters at about 4,000 ft wide. The lava lake, which has been continuously erupting since 1971 is about 2,600 feet inside the crater. I have made this descent twice, using static lines set down the three distinct sections of the crater wall to the crater floor. There is an amazing sense of wonder when staring up from the bottom of a 2,600-foot-tall bowl of rock. It made me realise just how small and inconsequential we are when compared to the power of the Earth.

√ I took this image during the first of my 25 descents to the Marum lava lake. I was waiting halfway up the crater wall to avoid being hit by falling rocks from a team member making his ascent. Sitting on a small ledge 150 feet above the lava lake, I started to personify the shapes in the crater wall opposite me and made out a face with horns. Local village chiefs spoke about the black magic associated with Ambrym Island. The volcano was described as a great aunt that
visitors should be careful of visiting as she’ll be obligated to visit you later. This, of course refers to volcanic activity, such as ash fall or acid rain falling on the village and destroying its crops.

√ The cooling crust of the lava within Nyiragongo contrasts with the freshly exposed magma boiling underneath. Nyiragongo is considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world because of its particularly fast-moving lava. It can flow more than 60 miles per hour due to the high silica content of the magma and has caused several deaths in the city of Goma 7.5 miles away.

√ A close-up image, taken from the edge of the Nyiragongo lava lake, 2,600 feet inside the crater, shows the texture created by cooling lava. During my second visit to Goma, our team, which included a volcanologist from the local observatory, who had assistance from the United Nations to fly us to the summit. Each attempt was hampered by white-out conditions that prevented us landing safely, so we hired 50 local porters to carry the tonne of supplies and equipment we needed and trekked the six hours by foot to the top.

√ The immense scale of Nyiragongo is illustrated by a team member surveying the condition of the lava lake. During a previous eruption in 2002, 40 percent of the nearest city was destroyed and more than 120,000 people were made homeless. During the second ascent out of the crater, a rock was dislodged high up hurtling towards me. It hit and damaged the metal drinking bottle attached to my harness, missing my thigh by inches. Had I been struck, it could have shattered my femur causing life threatening injuries.

√ To reach the continuously erupting volcano Batutara in Indonesia, you fly into Bali, then across the islands to Lembeta, before hitching a ride on a fishing trawler. Our team stayed on the island for two nights, camping at the high-tide mark of the beach just under 3,000 feet from the eruptions. Each eruption could be felt and sounded like a freight train rumbling by only a yard away. There are 150 volcanoes in Indonesia, and 76 are still active. Because Indonesia sits at the convergence of several major tectonic plates, there is intense geological activity over the subduction zone.

√ Basaltic magma is ejected out of Batatara during a stombolian eruption. The volcano is a small island just under two miles wide and pyroclasts eject violently from the main vent during regular and intermitent eruptions that have lasted more than eight years. The summit of the strato-volcano juts out of the Flores Sea and sits 31 miles from Lembata, a regency in Indonesia. A steep bank cuts across the eastern part from the summit down to the sea. If boats get too close, they run the risk of being struck by lava bombs hurtling down the side.

√ The alkaline lava erupted by Nyiragongo has an extremely low viscosity, making it almost as fluid as water. Alkaline lava has a melting temperature of more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The fluidity and extreme temperature of Nyiragongo’s lava make for a particularly deadly combination.

√ A team member stands as close as humanly possible to the lava lake while wearing a heat suit during our first successful descent, where both of us made it to the crater floor. I took this image from the halfway point to get the compression needed to bring all the elements together. Marum was a special place for me and our team. Numerous attempts had been made to safely get to the crater floor and out again. Each trip our team found better ways of getting access as well as learning better and safer routes inside the crater. We needed to lay about 1,000 feet of climbing rope to gain access, including drilling rock bolts into the dense basalt rock at the halfway point. As I made this photograph, I could hear the continuous high pitch noise from the air tanks warning that the supply of cool air was nearly depleted.

√ The eruptions at Batutara were like clockwork, every 15 minutes large ash clouds, pyroclastic flow and lava bombs would eject violently from the vent. During the last morning of our three-day expedition, we packed up camp on the uninhabited island and headed to the bay for pick up. While waiting for my turn to be rowed out to the fishing boat, Batutara erupted again, allowing me time to photograph the early morning light illuminating the gas cloud.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

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Warbirds 2024 Wall Calendar

$15.95

New battles require new tools, and Warbirds 2024 features a century of air power innovation. The WWI Bristol F.2b led to WWII Spitfires, the U.S. B-17, and the German Bf 109. More speed and power arrived with jet aircraft like the F-15 Strike Eagle, the F-22 Raptor, and the Eurofighter Typhoon. Don’t miss the evolving action in the air!.
This 2024 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Aircraft and events featured in this edition include:
• The mainstay of the U.S. ground attack interdictor force, the F-15-E Strike Eagle has been in service since 1988.
• The epitome of a modern jet-age aircraft, this F-16 Fighting Falcon effortlessly demonstrates the startling power of contemporary combat aircraft.
• Two RAF Spitfires, two of the “few,” take a deep breath and turn in to confront an incoming Luftwaffe raid in 1940.
• Just inches from completing another sortie, a B-17F settles down alongside the strip at Bassingbourn where the 91st Battle Group of the U.S. 9th Air Force operated from October 1942 until 1945.
• Messerschmitt Bf 109s drop down on a pair of RAF Hurricanes in a classic wing-over maneuver to fly out of the sun and attack their prey.
• Operated by more than 12 airlines and eventually the German Luftwaffe from the early 1930s, the Junkers Ju 52 was a groundbreaking transport aircraft.
• The Ryan PT-22 Recruit was the primary U.S. flight trainer at the start of World War II and the first monoplane aircraft for this purpose.
• The Eurofighter Typhoon is the main operational fighting aircraft of the RAF and six other Western nations.
• The Bristol F2b was the original fighter-bomber and saw service in the later part of World War I.
• This P-51 was based at RAF Duxford, and is finished in the livery of the 84th Fighter Squadron.
• The F-22 Raptor is an air-superiority fighter developed for the USAF capable of exceeding Mach 2.0 and operating at heights exceeding 65,000 feet.
Published by Tide-mark Press © 2023

Warbirds 2025 Wall Calendar

$17.95

Warbirds 2025 calendar features innovative airpower from WWII to contemporary jet power. Aircraft pictured range from the America’s B17 bomber and the belated Messerschmitt Me262, to the RAF Tornado and the U.S.A.F. F86. Don’t miss the action in the air!This 2025 monthly wall calendar features: Large blocks for notes | Superb printing quality | Heavy 100-pound paper | Deluxe 11- by 14-inch size
Aircraft and events featured in this edition include:

√ B17s of the 381st Bomber Group position themselves to make their final turns on the approach for their base at Ridgewell in East Anglia. Fine weather welcomes the returning crews at the conclusion of another day’s operations during World War II. There will be some time to relax, just a little, after about eight hours of combat flying.

√ The Hawker Hunter is a truly worthy successor of the fighter icons of the Royal Air Force in WW II. The airplane served in all areas of the world in a variety of roles. Some 2,000 examples of this elegant aircraft were built and supplied to no less than 13 different air forces throughout the world. This still operational example is in the livery of the RAF Farnborough detachment.

√ Designed in the early 1950s as a universal military transport, the Hercules C130 has proven to be a quite remarkable “jack of all trades.” Operated by more than 70 different countries’ air arms and still in production after 60 years, the Hercules is the most widely used military aircraft in history. Of particular value in limited war situations such as Vietnam and Afghanistan, the C130 is one of the first aircraft to appear in any conflict situation. It is seen here in typical “in trail” mode as flown by U.S. forces in recent conflicts.

√ The T33, shown here, was part of the United States air show team during the mid- to late- 1950s when it was deployed as a VIP and press aircraft. Although now retired from the team, this T33, resplendent in the 1950s team colours, was seen a few years ago at several American air shows.

√ Fortunately for the Allied war effort the Messerschmitt Me262 was late in arriving at Luftwaffe squadrons. In the latter stages of WW II, however, the jet fighter proved a powerful adversary with much superior speed and the considerable striking power of four 30mm cannons. Seen here punching up through the cloud layer attempting to gain the “perch” position —above, behind and up-sun— on the B17 formation about to arrive. The perfect position for interception.

√ The realities of jet air combat became very apparent during the Korean War when U.S. Air Force planes tangled with equivalent adversaries in Soviet Mig-series warplanes. Reacting to this challenge, the U.S.A.F. set up an intensive and aggressive training routine at Ellis Air Force Base. The F86 was at the early forefront of this training and this pair in formation is an example of the professional airmanship achieved.

√ The appearance of the Focke Wulf FW 190 in the summer of 1941 came as a considerable surprise to RAF fighter squadrons. Since their success in the Battle of Britain in September 1940, the Spitfire had enjoyed a fair measure of air superiority in the skies over northern France. With greater speed, maneuverability, and much heavier firing punch—two 23mm and two 20mm cannons— the FW 190 easily outclassed the current Spitfire Marks and turned the tables with a vengeance. In early 1942 a somewhat confused Luftwaffe pilot landed the latest version of the FW 190 at a southern England base, having mistaken it for Holland. The design secrets thus revealed, the later Spitfire Marks began to challenge the FW 190.

√ Celebrating the service of Polish World War II ace Ludwik Paszkiewicz, this Mig29 is an outstanding example of ‘nose’ art. Paszkiewicz made his way to the United Kingdom in June 1940 and became part of the Polish Squadron (330) which gave such sterling service at that time and was immortalised in the Battle of Britain film. Falling in combat on September 27, 1940, it is fitting that there is currently such an elegant memorial to his service.

√ Originally destined for the Chinese Air Force, this P40 Warhawk was diverted to the U.S. 5th Air Force in the Pacific and assigned to the 7th Fighter Squadron. After retiring, the plane passed through several hands in Australia and was eventually restored to flying condition in 2002. Now owned by a French group, the P40 has appeared at various air shows since 2008. Immaculately finished in the colours of the 7th Fighter Squadron of the WW II period, the P40 is a magnificent reminder of the iconic P40 series. The 7th Fighter Squadron is still in service flying F22 Raptors— just a wee bit different! The image shows a group of 7th Squadron P40s on patrol in the Pacific area.

√ The 57th Fighter Group was stationed in Italy from 1944 to 1945. The 57th’s P47 Thunderbolts covered Alpine passes to ensure that the 20divisions of Axis troops in Italy could not make their way to fight in Europe. As the bar room song of the day had it, they were ”…skimmin’ the ridges to plaster the bridges,” and they did so most effectively. With virtually no air opposition, the 57th flew more than 38,000 air-to-ground sorties. including the Battle of the Brenner Pass – the source for this image. Intense flak from supporting German ground forces, however, inflicted significant losses on the 57th. The unsung heroes of the 64th, 65th and 66th Fighter Squadrons comprised the 57th Fighter Group.

√ A Royal Air Force Tornado flies through the Welsh low-level training area, known as the Mach loop. The area is used by all types of aircraft from many nations and affords superlative views of real low-level flying. The photographers are well known to the aircrew and are often recognised by a wave salute as they sweep past. Where low is low.

√ Developed from the Su17, the Russian Su22 is the export version of this formidable ground attack aircraft that carries the NATO code-name Fitter. An early example of swing-wing technology, the Su22 served with many air forces and is still current with the Polish Air Force. Lately Poland decided to retain the Su22 for at least a further three years as it is easier to maintain than their Mig29s and F16s. With more than 2,800 of the various types built, the SU22 is a real Cold War survivor.

Published by Tide-mark Press © 2024

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